Blog

The importance of recreational activities for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

Adults with developmental disabilities are at a greater risk of cardiovascular problems. Regular physical activity can help all adults stay healthy and fit, but it is especially true for adults with developmental disabilities. Benefits of staying active Being a caregiver to someone with developmental disabilities we often think about assuring that they are healthy, eating well, getting enough sleep, and taking medications properly. However, making sure that they have a full and meaningful life means so much more then these basic needs being met. We want to add a sense of richness to their life and socialization, recreation, and getting

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Social and Physical Boundaries for Adults with Developmental Disabilities

Social Boundaries Those with developmental disorder have lower inhibitions that can affect social development. Understanding what may or may not be socially appropriate is a difficult task for those with developmental disabilities. Whether it is to make friends or sit for a job interview, it’s imperative to teach social boundaries to those with developmental disabilities. To prepare for everyday conversations, you can help your loved one with developmental disabilities be prepared for those conversations by role playing and acting out common scenarios and conversations. You can teach skills on friendship and how to develop a solid friendship. Showing them videos

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Escape-Maintained Behaviors

Tantrums, refusal, disruptive behaviors Escape behaviors are frequently discussed by care takers and parents as common behaviors they see their child or family member engage in. Teachers also share the same challenges from their students. ABA therapists often hear things like, “He constantly refuses to take a shower and brush his teeth. If I push him to do it, he becomes very angry and runs to his room…” or “A few of my students refuse to do any writing assignments and say that it’s too hard without even trying”. Escape behaviors can be challenging to manage and can be disruptive

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Positive Reinforcement

Everyday we tend to engage in behaviors because of the reinforcements we receive for those behaviors. We work to receive a paycheck, put in more hours at the office to receive praise from our co-workers or go to the gym because a workout makes ourselves feel good. Our kids strive for good grades in school for rewards when they bring home their report card. We work for reinforcers… We know what reinforces our behaviors… Positive Reinforcement is a type of intervention in which a desirable stimulus is given after a behavior increasing the likelihood that the behavior will occur again.

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College Readiness for adults with Autism

There are many students who would benefit from additional out of school supports to help prepare for a rigorous college life. For example, many young adults struggle with the transition into college life when it comes to being on their own living in dorms, what are resources available to them for accommodations, how to self-advocate for themselves. Parents of young adults with disabilities should help provide support by creating a list of needs and interests in their academics with the best fit in mind when conducting research with their children. Once admitted into a college student with disabilities should meet

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The “NO” word

There is a general list of demands that can provoke a negative response. Saying “no” can be one of the more significant ones that can lead to problematic behavior. The acceptance of the word “no” can be difficult for many to accept. Accepting “no” is even more challenging for those with developmental disabilities. Accepting “no” can have a more desired outcome and can be positively received when choices are provided. Many time parents or caregivers receive a negative response to the demand of “no”. Providing options is much like redirecting, ultimately you are providing an alternative, rather than the original

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Self Injurious Behavior and Autism Spectrum Disorder

What Is SIB? According to research done by Psychology Research and Behavior Management 50% of people diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) engage in some form of Self Injurious Behavior (SIB) that can lead to self injury. SIB refers to behaviors in which someone inflicts harm upon themselves. Examples of SIB: Head banging Hair pulling Self-biting Self-cutting Skin scratching Why do individuals engage in SIB? Many caretakers, guardians and parents have difficulty understanding why their family member might engage in self-injurious behavior and are very alarmed when this behavior occurs. SIB can be violent and put the individual at a

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Tips for the Holidays

Breaks from school, work, and daily routine is what the holidays tend to bring. While they may be a time to relax for us, it is not the same for those with developmental disabilities. The holidays for developmentally disabled individuals can cause anxiety and confusion. With the hustle and bustle of the holidays it is good to take a proactive approach and plan ahead of all the festive celebrations. Here are some helpful tips we gathered to create a more conducive environment for your loved ones who do not do well with events outside of the norm. Plan Ahead Of

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Holiday Events, Family, Food – There Is A Story For That!!!

The holidays are a joyous time in which we come together to celebrate. However, this time of year can present challenges for those with disabilities and their families trying to navigate through the holidays. Family events, changes in schedule, over stimulation, and different foods can become overwhelming for those who may not do well with change. Luckily in the world of applied behavior analysis, we have a great tool that can be utilized for many different social situations. Social Stories are a tool that is used to simplify descriptions of a concept, situation, or social skill that can be individualized

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